“Fourteenth of the Hill” – Repainting Triss Merigold, part 3

So we finally arrive at the last part of the description of my repainting Triss Merigold. This time we will take care of her leather corset and base, and the model will basically be done. 🙂
If you want to check the previous parts, here is part 1 and here is part 2.

Repainting the leather corset

So yeah, there have been some questions about the way I painted the corset. Well, I am not sure if it is the proper name for the piece of her clothing, but let’s just go with it. 😉

Basics for my leather painting

The whole painting thing was pretty straightforward, pretty similar to the process described in the section about repainting skin. You can look it up there if you haven’ yet.

See, similar method here – started with underpainting, too.

You wanted to know how I achieved the effect of worn and weathered leather. I’m always glad to share my experience with the community, but answering everybody individually becomes time-consuming and monotoneus. Because curious painters are my favorite kind of people ;), I will try to make your day with this article.

Test board. Nothing fancy. Just colors, numbers and some curly thing. 😉

Testing

I started working on the corset with a test board. I tweaked the color of my paint and checked the effects. Here are the paints I decided to go with:

Just because you don’t want to paint over things you have already done or simply want to keep some surfaces clean, you shouldn’t ignore masking. Once you’re ready, you can start painting!

Here you can see the colors put to use on the model already:

And on the back:

Pose carefully, look fancy. Even when being painted 😉

Applying colors

And here you can see the lightestcolors being applied on the front, but this is where the real fun begins…

Now I started testing methods of achieving this cracked, weathered look of worn leather. On the test board, obviously. Not risking the model yet!

I got the first satisfactory result from Vallejo Crackle Medium, which turned out great. I eagerly repeated the process on the corset and…? Nothing, as far as I could see. I got really suspicious if the Crackle Medium is not a capricious slut. 😉 So I told her she’s an energy vampire and I tossed her into a black hole. Don’t make me apologize for this! 😀

The culprit. There is no love between us!

Problem solved!

The next successful test was made with an effect presented to me by Rejven, my team-mate. It was originally a way to achieve marble effect and uses metal wool. You flatten it and use as a stencil for airbrushing.
If you try this method and initially fail, don’t get discouraged. 😀 I only appreciated my wool after a few attempts, and it was the best when it got all glued with paint.

It’s no crazy alien being attacking Triss. This is the metal wool I used 🙂

I applied a mix of varied intensity and color onto light base coat. Usually starting from lighter and going to darker ones. See it here:

Check the weathering on her leather bra part. That was really the effect I was going for!

See the weathering. Shaping up as planned!

Working on different parts of the leather, moving the wool to different parts of the model….

No, it’s not hair on her chest. 😀

Here’s how it looked on the lower parts of the corset:

And the darkest layers bring out the most of the weathering effect, creating the old leather effect:

Finishing touches

Finally I applied a bit of visual separation of the trimming and decorative stitches with my paintbrush:

That’s more or less the finished effect.

So that’s basically the whole process. For me the effect was completely satisfactory!

Repainting the base

This model’s base is boring but I had the impression that the wolf sculpt has some potential and can be interpreted in many ways. I decided to go with metallized rock effect. Thanks to the deep sculpt it didn’t require much more than using my airbrush nearly in parallel with the base and emphasizing the volume a bit. It must have been my favorite silver from Vallejo, which is 77.724 Silver.

I did the light reflex in the eye with Metallic Medium from Vallejo applied with airbrush. Then I covered it with a turquoise mix of inks. It’s important to use transparent paints to tint metallics, as they will not make surfaces look flat, but only saturate them with colors.

The next thing to do was using a paintbrush and black paint to paint cracks and grooves around the eye.

I colored the silver here and there by airbrushing some brown ink, and then I covered everything with clear varnish.

And this is what it looks like now:

The model is not finished on the photo, but the base is! 🙂

Done! My thoughts?

I hope I managed to encourage you to buy some statues and proved that they can really look good if you only put some time into upgrading them. Many of them were created by top sculptors, who are paasionate about capturing personalities of our favorite characters from games, comics or movies. I’ll gladly get myself a few more to enhance their looks.

I appeal to you that you don’t settle for the standard, mediocre, factory paintjobs, because it can only be better than that 😀

Now I am compiling a gallery of pics of the finished model, which I will share with you soon!

How to paint Rasputina – tutorial

I’ve been a great fan of HR Giger‘s art for years. Nothing unusual among us, fantasy and sci-fi fans. But being a miniature painter I always wanted to paint a miniature in a style inspired by HR Giger’s art. When I wondered how to paint Rasputina from Wyrd Games, the concept came to my head…

Everything became clear immediately when I grabbed the base that I chose for the model. The image I had in my head was so strong that I can’t even think about how disappointed I would have been if the customer would have said “no” to my concept.

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

[inset side=left]I wanted the paintings to immediately remind of Giger’s work.[/inset]

But how can you be surprised? If the whole world is so full of Giger references, how can my little head be an exception? I started with what I had a complete idea ready for – the face on the base (from Scibor Monstrous Miniatures).

My intention was not to copy any particular artwork, but more along the lines of using it as inspiration and fitting it into my own compositions. Still I wanted the paintings to immediately remind of Giger‘s work.

Is there anything that I regret now? Oh, yes. The fact that I didn’t decide to put screws in her cheeks. The idea is still on my mind, maybe to be used one day?

How to paint Rasputina’s base

For the base my inspiration were these two paintings:

HR Giger: Debbie I
HR Giger: Debbie I

HR Giger: Li II
HR Giger: Li II

Here’s my initial color palette, the colors that I started with.

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

And the brush that I chose for this part of work. It was going to be fine-detailed painting, so a 3/0 brush from Raphael 8404 series was a good starting point.

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

And off to painting we go…

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

While painting such parts remember to take advantage of being able to rotate your model. Adjust its position so your brushstrokes aren’t too much of a challenge to pull off.

[inset side=right]I turned my model upside down, so the rounded shape didn’t require any corrections.[/inset]

Here I wanted to achieve a nice, rounded finish for the stripes, so I turned my model upside down so I could pull the brush from the top downward, so the rounded shape didn’t require any corrections.

I know that everybody is holding their brush in their own way, so I recommend that you pay attention and observe the way you’re working with your brushes, so that you can take advantage of your own work style. Such little details make painting much more enjoyable and faster.

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

I added little touches like the shadow under the diadem. They may seem to be only minor things in the overall picture, but I found they add a lot to the feel and completeness of the whole paintjob:

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

Sometimes I thought it would be better to break the surface into smaller ones somehow. And in fact sometimes I treated this idea quite literally. 😉

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

And this is what my palette looked like by the time I finished painting the head. Much richer than at the beginning, isn’t it? 😉

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

Now here is a photo of the finished head. This photo shows its colors, tints and hues much better than my humble WIP pictures:

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina’s cloak: front

Here’s what I started the cloak with:

HR Giger: A. Crowley the Beast 666
HR Giger: A. Crowley the Beast 666

For the cloak I chose motifs that would look good in the composition, but also the ones that I liked more.

Sometimes shapes or edges of the sculpt suggest me where to place those motifs. A photo is always flat, so you may have difficult time noticing the reasons why I placed those details the way I did…

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

When I planned how to place the first three graphic elements, the surrounding space inspired me with its shape and shadows to arrange it this way, with the skull and female body:

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

And here’s another motif from Giger, arranged to follow the edge:

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

And the lower right part, below Rasputina’s feet, just begged to be painted with those… let’s call them “fishes” for political correctness’ sake:

HR Giger: Vlad Tepes
HR Giger: Vlad Tepes

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

When I covered all the surfaces with freehands, I considered the front of Rasputina’s cloak done:

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina’s cloak: back

I got a bit distracted and forgot to catch the earlier stages of painting this element on my photos, so here’s the first shot of this part I managed to get:

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

There were two paintings from Giger that were my inspiration for this part of my paintjob:

HR Giger: Spell II
HR Giger: Spell II

HR Giger: Li II
HR Giger: Li II

This time I had to start with some larger shapes, so I started with a larger brush. A 1 from Raphael 8404 series:

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

I planned to place the skulls on raised parts of the surface and started painting the weaved pattern. The way I painted it will be easy to follow on the next few photos. Painting such plaiting could be explained in a few points:

[inset side=right]Painting plaiting could be explained in a few repeating points.[/inset]

  • sketching the lines,
  • separating them with the classic black line, creating a chaotic plaiting,
  • glazing over the whole surface,
  • adding more lines,
  • separating them with the classic black line, creating a chaotic plaiting again,
  • adding another layer of highlight on visually more raised lines to emphasize zenithal lighting of the model,
  • glazing over the whole surface again,

… and so on, until I ended up with what you saw on the photo above. See the whole process on the following photos. After this the surface was ready to paint a few skulls on it.

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

To add some color variation between the elements – the skulls and the background, I shaded the skulls with a slight addition of this color:

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

Although it is not a huge difference, it brings them a bit forward and sets them off from the background, as you can see on this photo:

Adding the fern

Now that the main model was painted I decided to tweak the base a bit, so I can also show you how I played with the fern:

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

Despite all my admiration of this pattern of bases, I must admit that the way those floral motifs are sculpted is not making painting any easier. I decided to cover them a bit, but to tie the real fern a bit more with the sculpted ones, I had to exaggerate a bit on the real thing, making it a bit grotesque:

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

[inset side=left]I used strong hair modelling gel to shape the fern[/inset]

As you can see I applied some glazing and then drybrushed highlights on it before applying the fern on the base. Later I only needed to tweak shading a bit, and adjust the shape of my fern.

I used strong hair modelling gel to shape the fern:

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

See how it added some detail and depth to the base?

Finished model

Done! My model was ready.

Now you can see which bits from Giger’s paintings were my inspiration for which parts of my paintjob.

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

Here’s the finished paintjob. I think the question “how to paint Rasputina” has at least one answer now. Not the only one for sure…
But if you happen to have any more questions, feel free to ask them. I will try to answer and offer my help where I can.

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

How to paint Rasputina the Ice Witch (Alternative) - tutorial

I am really curious what you are going to do with your interpretations of this little miniature. Looking forward to seeing your versions!

Want more?

[inset side=right]This special pack includes the tutorial enhanced with even larger photos.[/inset]

Although this is already the whole tutorial that I prepared for you, and I think the size of photos is completely sufficient for understanding the process and concepts behind my paintjob, we prepared some kind of a gift for some of you! Or actually a way of saying THANK YOU to those who offered donations that help us run the website.

This special pack includes the tutorial enhanced with even larger photos. They allow to see details that you might have difficult time spotting even in real life, including flaws, imperfections and often even individual brush strokes.

So if any of you decided to share a donation with us and let us know you are interested in the bonus, and we’ll make it available to you. This is our way of showing our gratitude for supporting us.

Thanks for your interest and enjoy the tutorial!

Painting Hell Dorado Immortals warband – Tutorial

Welcome to the article devoted to painting a whole warband. I will try to give you a step by step photo report. And the main actors will be Immortals from Asmodee/Cipher Studios.

Stage 1: Know your models

So we spent few euro or dollars, bought some cool looking models and it is time to have a good look what did you get. Maybe there are some parts missing? Maybe there are some miscasts?

If everything is ok, then now is the last call to have an idea how to paint the warband. What theme or background story? What color scheme? What units? What bases?

In my case the answers are no theme, original red-gold scheme, all units, Scibor‘s bases. It makes putting such group easier when there is a clear idea in your head. I know I am not being original, but this is also a decision later to stick to. 😉

So I take a good look at all the miniatures and put in separate piles. I try to, without glue, put these together and see if the parts match. Now is the perfect time to think about conversions and to look for extra parts in your bits box. If you found something there, just put it on the pile.

Stage 2: Removing mould lines and putting models together

Those models are supposed to fight on the table and we all know what happens to them when transporting or falling over on the table. That is why I try to pin the parts together. Tools that I use:

The pins which will hold the parts together are done (or better cut) from paper clips:

There should be also a picture of super glue or any metal glue, that glues the metal parts in few seconds. 🙂

A word about mould lines… I hate them! To clean them, takes a lot of time, but I see no other way. This job takes plenty of time, but it is simple. Believe me, it is worth to clean the miniatures from them. Later they will take a lot of the miniatures’ beauty away. I spent 2 evenings to clean all the parts from mould lines, but this job needs to be done – even on tabletop miniatures! Now, when all the parts are separate and easy to reach, it is the best time to remove them. Later it will won’t be easier. 😉

So let’s move to some examples – this djin has be cleaned from mould lines and all the parts are together (so that I won’t forget anything).

First I try to glue the biggest parts, in this case it is the torso. You can see on the picture a small cut from pater clip (called a pin) and two holes (drilled by me) in both parts of the torso. Before you glue – try to pin the parts without glue – if it’s ok, put some glue on the parts and into the pinning holes. If not then maybe the pin is to long or the holes too small?

To be sure that you drill the holes in perfect positions on both parts, try this simple trick:

  1. Drill a hole in one part,
  2. Put some paint around the hole,
  3. Try both parts together (with your fingers, not glue),
  4. Remove the second part and you should see the exact place where to drill.

And there we have a finished cleaned and pinned djin.

While removing mould lines from a ‘froggy warrior’ I accidentally broke the lance into two parts. It happens quite often, when the parts are small and fragile.

So what did I do – first I finished removing all the mould lines:

… and drilled holes in both parts and pinned them:

I also had a bit of problems with glueing the small parts with the torso, but with the help from pincette it was much easier. Here are the horns that are supposed to go on the shoulder pads:

I stick glued and pinned models together on cork. It makes further steps, like cleaning/gap filling/painting, much easier. You can easily rotate the cork and not touch the miniature. Another benefit is that when you clean the miniature (more to come), it won’t get dirty or greasy from fingers.

At the end of this step we get something like this:

Stage 3: Preparing for painting

All miniatures are on cork, waiting to be painted. Before we go to this step, there are some more things to be done. Usually glued minis have gaps, holes that don’t look nice. With these tools I will fill them:

Here is a mercenary djin with filled gaps.

I must admit, that using liquid green stuff from Games Workshop helps a lot. Filling small gaps isn’t a problem, but sometimes the gaps are too big, just like here:

The best way is to use normal green stuff or any other putty.

Now we are almost ready with putting undercoat, almost… We were touching the miniatures with dirty hands and the miniatures need a wash, so that the undercoat spray will hold on the miniature better. It will also remove any fat or oils from manufacturing process. We just need an old tooth brush, soap and dish washing liquid.

Pour some hot water and gently wash the miniature. I had no problems will super glue losing its characteristic because of water, so I can say it is safe!

Stage 4: Priming

Give the miniatures a day or two to dry and now we can finally prime the miniatures. This time I have used the Tamiya grey primer:

The from a distance of 30cm I spray each miniature 3 times:

[list class=bullet-2]

  • from each side (vertically)
  • from top (from each side)
  • from below (from each side too)
  • I just hate when later there are some not covered places on a miniature and the paint doesn’t stick.

    And there you have it, now we can finally start to paint the Immortals. You may think and say that it is way too much for all those steps before painting. I think it is worth to spend 2-3 evenings longer to have no problems later.

    Stage 5: Painting human skin

    It is important to plan the painting on all miniatures in a band. I thought the best option will be to paint the biggest areas first. That is why I started with human skin.

    Step 1

    First I’ve created a base color:

    [list class=bullet-2]

  • pink 10%
  • Bronzed Flesh 20%
  • white 10%
  • Elf Flesh 60%
  • You might wonder why a bit of pink. 🙂 Well it is because in my opinion it gives a more natural look and makes the skin look more interesting. The paint was diluted 1:1 with water, so I had to cover the skin twice with the base color.

    Step 2

    Then I gave the whole skin a wash of Ogryn Flesh and Devlan Mud in the deepest shadows.

    Step 3

    When the washed surface was really dry (I waited about 30 minutes), I covered the muscles with the base color plus I added some more white to the mix.

    Step 4

    For the final highlight I mixed 40% base color with white.

    Stage 6: Painting the creature’s skin

    Step 1

    Once again I started with making a base color:

    [list class=bullet-2]

  • Hormagaunt Purple 20%
  • Elf Flesh 40%
  • Menoth White 40%
  • There is only a small bit of purpule, but it is very visible. It is because Hormagaunt Purple is a foundation paint and those have much more pigment in it.

    Step 2

    Leviathan Purple wash and a bit of purple + black wash in those deepest shadows.

    Step 3

    Just like with the human skin, I highlighted the muscles with base color.

    Step 4

    Top places were highlighted with 50:50 mix of base color and white.

    At this stage I think I can say I am 25% done. 🙂 That is the biggest advantage when choosing the correct order of painting – you get the results fast and you stay motivated. 🙂

    Stage 7: Painting the red clothes

    Now we come to the best part, well in my opinion, painting the red parts. I know an easy way how to paint good looking reds and now I will share my secret with you. 😉

    The secret is simple when it comes to red, there are two important things:

    1. What color is under the red,
    2. Don’t highlight the red, just darken it.

    Step 1

    As always I make a base color mix and cover the whole parts:

    [list class=bullet-2]

  • Blood Red 30%
  • Scrab Red 50%
  • Dark Flesh 20%
  • Step 2

    To the base color I add more Blood Red and pink.

    Step 3

    For the final and brightest highlights there is just Blood Red & white.

    Step 4

    Now comes the most important part. Paint pure Blood Red diluted with water, on all those highlighted areas. Do you now see the richness of red color?

    Step 5

    To make the red looking more interesting and more contrasting. I did a wash with Blood Red wash, a bit of black, purple, Scorched Brown and dark blue. Wash the deepest areas with this mix.

    This technique seems to be very intensive, but as you can see on the pictures you don’t have to be that accurate most of the time. 🙂 Even though it is very simple, I find it excellent for table top painting.

    So now the Immortals warband is 50% finished.

    Stage 8: Bases

    As already mentioned for the bases, I have decided to buy them from Scibor Miniatures. First of all they were cleaned and washed in water and soap. To save a bit of the money I bought a set with only heads. Seven bases I did on my own, trying to keep them similar to the ready ones, using just those heads, cork and sand.

    To make basecoating and painting easier, I wrapped a bit of adhesive tape on a piece of plastic. You can also buy a two side tape, that makes the whole job much easier.

    Everything was basecoated, and since I ran out of the grey primer, I had to use black one. 🙂

    Citadel Foundation brown paint was used to paint the ground.

    And the I just highlighted the earth with Bleached Bone by drybrushing.

    The stones were base coated with Citadel Foundation grey.

    Then I drybrushed it with Codex Grey.

    Another drybrush with Games Workshop‘s Space Wolves Grey

    The last stage was to drybrush with pure Skull White only at some of the most visible places.

    The flowers were painted green and dry brushed with yellow, some static grass was ‘planted’ and the rims were painted dark brown:

    Stage 9: Painting white

    Because the miniatures were primed with grey, I didn’t have much to do here. This is how they looked after priming:

    Then I heavily diluted the Games Workshop‘s Codex Grey with a bit of blue to make a wash:

    After that I just highlighted with white:

    Stage 10: Painting metallics

    I already told you, that I paint in a way to cover the biggest surfaces first. After painting the skin, reds and white now is the time to paint some gold and silver. I was painting them together at the same time.

    For gold I first used Games Workshop‘s Shining Gold and washed it with Gryphone Sepia:

    Then with Burnished Gold I highlighted the most visible scales on the armour and shoulder pads. For the silver parts I have used Chainmail Silver.

    The silver parts were light lighted with Mithril Silver.

    Then the silver was washed with Badab Black wash.

    And again with the same wash. 🙂 Just to make the silver look older.

    Then while I was painting the ethereal smoke, I came up with an idea to make the metallics look more interesting and break the color. I painted small areas with very diluted Scaly Green to make patina.

    As you can see, the miniatures are already 90% done!

    Stage 11: Painting ethereal smoke

    This one also goes really fast. First wash the smoke/cloud with grey.

    Then comes a wash with a mix of Scaly Green and Scorpion Green. That mixture goes into the deepest areas. At this stage if you would like the smoke to have different color, i.e. purple, you could mix some other paints.

    At the very end with white paint I just highlighted some areas to make the contrast stronger.

    And that’s it…

    Because of the batch painting the war band was fully painted in 3 months. In case I didn’t paint every evening, so it is possible to finish them in much shorter time.

    I already hear you asking – what about not painted parts? Well those parts were painted just using one paint only. The painting colors were really simple:

    [list class=bullet-2]

  • hair – Chaos Black, drybrush with Codex Grey
  • sticks – Scorched Brown
  • shoes – Bestial Brown
  • leather strips – Gore Red
  • The point was to have a painted war band in a very short time, that is why I tried to focus on the biggest and most visible surfaces.

    Now it’s time for some final photos.

    Finished Hell Dorado Immortals

    My both Hell Dorado armies together:

    Please give me suggestions how to show, explain things better. Everything that could make such articles more interesting and informative. Ask many questions, tell me if I didn’t explain something clearly.

    Thank you for support. 🙂

    — Sea.man

    Painting Malifaux Seamus the Mad Hatter – Tutorial

    This will be a little walkthrough / tutorial on how I painted my Malifaux Seamus the Mad Hatter from Wyrd Miniatures. This Mad Hatter tutorial is also the first one I ever wrote. 😉

    Seamus the Mad Hatter – tutorial

    For priming I used a combination of black and white primer.

    Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (1)

    Generally I use a basecoat color, 3-4 shadows and 3-4 highlights for one part/detail. So I end up with a total of 7-9 colors which I use to create the transition from the deepest shadow to the brightest highlight.

    Paint mixing ratios

    All my paint ratios in this Mad Hatter tutorial represent my drop count (I have all my GW paints refilled in empty Vallejo-like dropper bottles which makes it easier for me when mixing colors) – for example:

    GW Tallarn Flesh : VMC Dark Flesh #019 (3:1)
    3 drops GW Tallarn Flesh : 1 drop VMC Dark Flesh #019
    GW = Games Workshop / Citadel
    VMC = Vallejo Model Colour

    Dilution

    Dilution of my paints is about 50% paint to 50% water for glazing (highlights and shadows) and my basecoat is a little bit thicker so about 70% paint to 30% water.

    Ok, let’s get started with painting the Malifaux Seamus the Mad Hatter miniature. 🙂

    1. Face, eyes and skin:

    It’s good for all the readers of my Seamus the Mad Hatter tutorial to know that I always start with the head/face of a mini and then move to the next part. I only paint one part at a time and pretty much finish it before I move to the next one. For the skin I used GW Tallarn Flesh as a basecoat color and applied 2-3 thin layers until I had nice even coverage.

    • Basecoat: GW Tallarn Flesh

    [inset side=right]I always start with the head/face of a mini and then move to the next part. I only paint one part at a time and pretty much finish it before I move to the next one.[/inset]

    After the skin was basecoated I painted the eyes:

    1. First I painted the eye-socket white.
    2. Next I thinned down some VMC Black #169 (about 20% paint : 80% water) and used it to outline the eye-socket by letting the paint flow into the recesses by itself.
    3. Usually I mess up the white eye-socket a bit or my outline will end up being to intense/thick. Therefore I carefully repaint the eye-socket white and correct the black outline a bit.
    4. Next I painted black dots for the pupils with a less diluted paint (70-80% paint : 30-20% water).

    Once the eyes were done I switched back to his skin and started with the shadows.

    I applied the first shadow always moving the brush towards the deepest parts which will later receive the darkest color and using many layers always leaving a bit of the previous brush stroke untouched to build up the first shadow. Then I applied the second and third shadow also leaving a bit of the previous shadow untouched to build a transition towards the darkest shadow. Colors I used for the shadows:

    • Shadow I: GW Tallarn Flesh : GW Scorched Brown (6:1)
    • Shadow II: GW Tallarn Flesh : GW Scorched Brown (3:1)
    • Shadow III: GW Tallarn Flesh : GW Scorched Brown (1:1)

    The last shadow color (Shadow IV) was used for the deepest recesses like his mouth and facial wrinkles.

    • Shadow IV: GW Scorched Brown

    Then I started painting highlights. It’s pretty much the same as with shadows – moving the brush towards the highest parts which will receive most of the light, always leaving a bit of the previous highlight untouched to build a transition from the basecoat to my last highlight. The method presented here, in this Mad Hatter tutorial, is the one I usually use. Colors used for the highlights:

    • Highlight I: GW Tallarn Flesh : VMC Dark Flesh #019 (3:1)
    • Highlight II: GW Tallarn Flesh : VMC Dark Flesh #019 (1:1)
    • Highlight III: GW Tallarn Flesh : VMC Dark Flesh #019 : GW Skull White (1:1:2)

    I used the last highlight (Highlight IV) only for a few bright-spots.

    • Highlight IV: GW Tallarn Flesh : VMC Dark Flesh #019 : GW Skull White (1:1:4)

    Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (2)

    2. Hair:

    I basecoated his hair with the following mix:

    • Basecoat: GW Shadow Grey : VMC Black #169 (2:1)

    Then highlighted it getting brighter towards the outside with the following colors:

    • Highlight I: GW Codex Grey (1:1 water)
    • Highlight II: GW Codex Grey : GW Skull White (2:1:3 water)

    3. Coat, tuxedo and hat

    I did some preshading and highlighting here that’s not something I usually do it sometimes just happens. 😉

    Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (3)

    After this was done I messed around with mix-ratios until I was satisfied with the colors and came out with the following mixes:

    • Highlight IV: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : GW Space Wolves Grey (2:1:9) + some GW Skull White
    • Highlight III: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : GW Space Wolves Grey (2:1:9)
    • Highlight II: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : GW Space Wolves Grey (2:1:6)
    • Highlight I: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : GW Space Wolves Grey (2:1:3)
    • Basecoat: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise (2:1)
    • Shadow I: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : VMC Black #169 (2:1:1)
    • Shadow II: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : VMC Black #169 (2:1:2)
    • Shadow III: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : VMC Black #169 (2:1:3)

    I painted highlights and shadows like described in the face part always moving the brush towards the deepest shadows and brightest highlights, using many thin layers and slowly building up the color.

    The last highlight (Highlight IV) was only used on the upper parts as a last “popping” highlight like on the folds on his arm or his collar.

    Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (4)

    4. Belt-thing on his hat

    • Highlight III: GW Bestial Brown : GW Bleached Bone (2:3)
    • Highlight II: GW Bestial Brown : GW Bleached Bone (2:2)
    • Highlight I: GW Bestial Brown : GW Bleached Bone (2:1)
    • Basecoat: GW Bestial Brown
    • Shadow I: GW Bestial Brown : VMC Black #169 (3:1)
    • Shadow II: GW Bestial Brown : VMC Black #169 (3:2)

    5. Pants

    I paint every part as described above (first I apply the basecoat with 2-3 layers and then paint the shadows and highlights) so for the next few parts of my Mad Hatter tutorial I will only post the colors I used. 🙂

    • Highlight III: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth : VMC Yellow Ochre #121 (2:1:3)
    • Highlight II: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth : VMC Yellow Ochre #121 (2:1:2)
    • Highlight I: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth : VMC Yellow Ochre #121 (2:1:1)
    • Basecoat: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth (2:1)
    • Shadow I: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth : GW Scorched Brown (2:1:1)
    • Shadow II: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth : GW Scorched Brown (2:1:2)
    • Shadow III: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth : GW Scorched Brown (2:1:3)

    6. Weapon – wood

    • Basecoat: GW Bestial Brown : VMC Dark Flesh (2:1)
    • Shadow I: GW Bestial Brown : VMC Dark Flesh : GW Scorched Brown (2:1:1)
    • Shadow II: GW Bestial Brown : VMC Dark Flesh : GW Scorched Brown (2:1:2)
    • Shadow III: GW Bestial Brown : VMC Dark Flesh : GW Scorched Brown (2:1:3)

    Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (5)

    7. NMM

    Some of you may be checking this Mad Hatter tutorial in search for my NMM recipe. When I painted the NMM parts like his blade I tried to to push the highlights up to pure white and the shadows to a dark almost black tone. The colors I used for the silver NMM parts were:

    Silver NMM

    • Highlight IV: GW Skull White (pure)
    • Highlight III: GW Codex Grey : GW Skull White (1:3)
    • Highlight II: GW Codex Grey : GW Skull White (1:2)
    • Highlight I: GW Codex Grey : GW Skull White (1:1)
    • Basecoat: GW Codex Grey
    • Shadow I: GW Codex Grey + VMC Black #169 (3:1)
    • Shadow II: GW Codex Grey + VMC Black #169 (2:1)
    • Shadow III: GW Codex Grey + VMC Black #169 (2:2)
    • Shadow IV: GW Codex Grey + VMC Black #169 (2:3)

    To increase the last shadow a bit on the silver NMM parts I used some very diluted black (like a wash it was mostly “black water”) and carefully glazed this mix at the very end (bottom) of the last shadow.

    Gold NMM

    All Gold NMM parts were painted with the following colors:

    • Highlight III: GW Skull White (pure)
    • Highlight II: GW Snakebite Leather : GW Bubonic Brown : GW Skull White (1:1:3)
    • Highlight I: GW Snakebite Leather : GW Bubonic Brown : GW Skull White (1:1:1)
    • Basecoat: GW Snakebite Leather : GW Bubonic Brown (1:1)
    • Shadow I: GW Snakebite Leather : GW Bubonic Brown : GW Scorched Brown (1:1:1)
    • Shadow II: GW Snakebite Leather : GW Bubonic Brown : GW Scorched Brown (1:1:2)
    • Shadow III: GW Scorched Brown (pure)
    • Shadow IV: GW Scorched Brown : VMC Black #169 (2:1)

    When painting small details like the gold NMM stuff on his bag or the belt buckle on his hat I usually don’t use the complete range of mixes. I basecoat the area as usual, use the first shadow/highlight but then I leave the second mix out and jump to the third shadow/highlight.

    For large surfaces it’s the same procedure as with the other parts.

    Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (6)

    8. Bag & accessories

    The NMM parts were painted with the colors described above in an earlier part of this Mad Hatter tutorial and for the bag I used the following mixes:

    • Glaze: VMC Yellow Ochre #121 (80% water) — only glazed over the highlights to get a bit of a yellow in there
    • Highlight III: GW Bestial Brown : GW Bleached Bone (2:3)
    • Highlight II: GW Bestial Brown : GW Bleached Bone (2:2)
    • Highlight I: GW Bestial Brown : GW Bleached Bone (2:1)
    • Basecoat: GW Bestial Brown
    • Shadow I: GW Bestial Brown : GW Scorched Brown (2:1)
    • Shadow II: GW Bestial Brown : GW Scorched Brown (2:2)
    • Shadow III: GW Bestial Brown : GW Scorched Brown (2:3)

    Ok that’s pretty much it. I hope you enjoyed reading this little walkthrough and found something interesting.

    Done!

    And here are some final pictures of the miniature. If you recreated the steps presented in my Seamus the Mad Hatter tutorial, you should achieve similar results:

    Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (7)

    — P1per

    How to paint NMM chrome – SENMM Wolf Priest tutorial

    Maybe the huge hype for SE-NMM and NMM chrome has already passed, but this tutorial is surely still worth publishing. In 2005 I painted a Space Wolves wolf priest and people asked how to paint NMM chrome like the one on that model.

    As I was receiving questions about my Wolf Priest and the way I painted him, I spent some time and typed this description for you. Maybe it’s not a typical step-by-step, but it’s the best I could do with the mini already painted and even not having it at home anymore. Enjoy 🙂

    Photo: NMM chrome - Tutorial

    First steps

    After spraying the whole mini black, I applied a layer of white over the kneepads and other elements which were supposed to be chrome.

    Fur cloak

    I painted the internal side of the fur with Vallejo GC41 “DWARF SKIN”. Then I highlighted its protruding parts and the lower parts where more light falls. I did it by adding more and more Vallejo MC918 “IVORY” to GC41.

    I painted the fur to imitate the real wolf skin’s colors and patterns, using Vallejo MC992 “NEUTRAL GREY” near the outer parts (the edges), and Vallejo GC40 “COBRA LEATHER” nearer the center of the surface. When the paints were dry, I washed the cape with very thinned black paint.

    Before the wash was dry, I applied another layer of white basecoat onto the parts which I wanted to be painted like chrome.

    When the paint dried, I decided to add highlights: I used Vallejo MC907 “PALE GREYBLUE” for that, and with the side of the brush with tiny amount of paint on it I brushed along the whole fur’s surface.

    Skulls

    I started with basecoating with Vallejo GC40 “COBRA LEATHER” – except for the eyes and deep crevices. For highlighting I kept adding more and more Vallejo MC819 “IRAQUI SAND”. The last color applied was pure MC819.

    NMM steel

    I painted the steel (or silver) elements with the NMM method. For my basecoat I chose (like I always do) Vallejo MC903 “INTERMEDIATE BLUE”. The shading is done with black paint there, where you don’t need to go overboard with detailing and color transitions. There where I need smooth blending of colors I shade by adding more and more black to the black color. I clean and correct the parts which got messy, and highlight by adding more and more white to the base color. The final highlights are placed with pure white.

    NMM gold

    I used the same method to paint gold using Vallejo GC40 “COBRA LEATHER” as my basecolor, washing it with Vallejo MC939 “SMOKE”, and then – when the wash was dry – I highlighted with Vallejo MC877 “GOLDBROWN”. Where I wanted sharp highlights I placed dots of white paint.
    I think I can omit the part about the grenade? 😉

    NMM chrome

    I started painting with drawing the horizon on all the chrome elements with Vallejo MC822 “GERMAN BLACK BROWN”. The color of the ‘ground’ reflected in chrome depends on the color of the potential terrain. I decided to mix this basecolor with Vallejo GC40 “COBRA LEATHER” and highlight it by adding Vallejo MC819 “IRAQUI SAND” to the mix. So I painted the reflection of the ground going from the darkest to the lightest color 🙂 and I paint the reflection of the sky in the same way. The upper part was painted with Vallejo GC22 “ULTRA MARINE” (with a slight addition of Vallejo MC807 “OXFORD BLUE” in the darkest part), and then I only highlighted adding more and more white. The sky just over the horizon must be white, just like the edges of the painted part.

    The more the surface is leaning toward the ground, the more ground you see in the reflection. On the other hand – if the surface is rather pointing upwards, then you will see more sky than ground in the reflection. The same applies to painting the wolfheads. 🙂

    There’s one more thing you need to remember while painting chrome – every ‘tube’ or long round element – regardless on its position – will always have the horizon’s reflection along the ‘axis’ of the element. You can see it on my Liralith (in Hassslefree Miniatures gallery).

    Black armour

    And now I had to clean up the black armour, which was stained and dirty after the whole painting. I covered it with black paint, and applied the first highlight. It covers the biggest part of the surface, and every next highlight is placed on smaller and smaller surfaces. But I think it’s obvious, isn’t it? 😀

    I highlighted by adding white, but now I know that it looks good if for the first highlight you add a bit of Vallejo MC807 “OXFORD BLUE” to the black paint, and later you add white not to pur white but to this mix. It’s hard for me to describe where I painted the reflections of light, but for sure they were placed on the edges, and protruding parts, but I treated this subject pretty loosely and didn’t care too much for the realism and caring more for the overall effect and composition.

    I hope this description contains some of the information you wanted to get, but if something was hard to understand – don’t hesitate and ask me 🙂