Forge World Chaos Decimator – Review

Hi there!

When I found out about the release of a Forge World Chaos Decimator and Chaos being my soft spot I just couldn’t resist ordering it. Additional benefit being the fact that now I can share this Forge World Chaos Decimator review with you. 🙂

Ordering

I tend to order from Forge World early to get “fresh” moulds, and thus reduce the chances of miscast.

So, using my old habit when it comes to Forge World to order their releases early to get “fresh” moulds, and thus reduce the chances of miscast, I pre-ordered the Decimator and each weapon set right away. If I am not mistaken the release date was due on the 2nd of April and I received it on the 4th of April so kudos to them for shipping early (had I lived in UK I’d prolly had receive it before release so that’s a good point for them.)

Anyway onto the miniature!

Unboxing the Chaos Decimator for review

As you can see from the next picture, the body kit comes in a bag of 23 parts plus a standard 60mm base (not shown) and assembly instructions. In this Forge World Chaos Decimator review we will focus on the model itself.

Forge World Chaos Decimator - Review (1)

The weapons as for all dreadnoughts are sold separately. To my surprise, they now come into the same “new” blisters Games Workshop uses.

Forge World Chaos Decimator - Review (2)

Resin

As you can guess, and to my dread, you can recognize Finecast sprue and resin! I was starting to ramble and think about how many air bubbles I’d have to fix but I soon realised that this is not your everyday finecast. Both body and weapon’s resin is somewhat new (comparing to what FW used a year or so ago).

As you can guess, and to my dread, you can recognize Finecast sprue and resin!

To make this Chaos Decimator review more complete I should describe the material used. I am by no means professional when it comes to resin but I suppose this one is more or less from the same recipe as the Finecast one, but of much better quality. If you compare it to Finecast, this one is harder, while still being more flexible than what Forge World used to have. Like its finecast counterpart, it’s light and the mold lines are very easy to clean.

Casting quality

On this particular mini I found just a few mould lines, not badly placed (nothing in the way of details for example)

Also, as you can see from the pics, the details are sharp and crisp. To my relief the only air bubbles I found were on the resin excess you will throw away.

Overall I’d say that, unlike Games Workshop, Forge World has mastered this resin. This is what finecast should and must be. Great quality and no bubbles or any of the troubles we got used to see from Finecast.

Assembled Chaos Decimator

Anyway, I am cleaning and assembling it as I write this so for this Chaos Decimator review I’d just provide you with the official Forge World picture of the final product as I still have to magnetise all the weapons (which, considering how they are attached to their mounts shouldn’t be too difficult)

So this is the beast in its splendor:

Forge World Chaos Decimator - Review (3)

And the size comparison shot provided again by Forge World:

Forge World Chaos Decimator - Review (4)

Chaos Decimator review – Conclusion

To conclude, I think both gamers and painters alike would enjoy this mini. It is nicely detailed but without being overwhelming.

Being Chaos and rather big, it might prove to be more challenging to paint it up to competition standards than the Contemptor but I am sure we will see a few Decimators on the coming painting events! The dynamic posing and its size might also make it a good candidate for dioramas.

All in all I am happy with my purchase from Forge World, the quality of the sculpt and casting being very good, now we just need a cool Chaos Codex to come too!

— Ariakas

Painting Malifaux Seamus the Mad Hatter – Tutorial

This will be a little walkthrough / tutorial on how I painted my Malifaux Seamus the Mad Hatter from Wyrd Miniatures. This Mad Hatter tutorial is also the first one I ever wrote. 😉

Seamus the Mad Hatter – tutorial

For priming I used a combination of black and white primer.

Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (1)

Generally I use a basecoat color, 3-4 shadows and 3-4 highlights for one part/detail. So I end up with a total of 7-9 colors which I use to create the transition from the deepest shadow to the brightest highlight.

Paint mixing ratios

All my paint ratios in this Mad Hatter tutorial represent my drop count (I have all my GW paints refilled in empty Vallejo-like dropper bottles which makes it easier for me when mixing colors) – for example:

GW Tallarn Flesh : VMC Dark Flesh #019 (3:1)
3 drops GW Tallarn Flesh : 1 drop VMC Dark Flesh #019
GW = Games Workshop / Citadel
VMC = Vallejo Model Colour

Dilution

Dilution of my paints is about 50% paint to 50% water for glazing (highlights and shadows) and my basecoat is a little bit thicker so about 70% paint to 30% water.

Ok, let’s get started with painting the Malifaux Seamus the Mad Hatter miniature. 🙂

1. Face, eyes and skin:

It’s good for all the readers of my Seamus the Mad Hatter tutorial to know that I always start with the head/face of a mini and then move to the next part. I only paint one part at a time and pretty much finish it before I move to the next one. For the skin I used GW Tallarn Flesh as a basecoat color and applied 2-3 thin layers until I had nice even coverage.

  • Basecoat: GW Tallarn Flesh

[inset side=right]I always start with the head/face of a mini and then move to the next part. I only paint one part at a time and pretty much finish it before I move to the next one.[/inset]

After the skin was basecoated I painted the eyes:

  1. First I painted the eye-socket white.
  2. Next I thinned down some VMC Black #169 (about 20% paint : 80% water) and used it to outline the eye-socket by letting the paint flow into the recesses by itself.
  3. Usually I mess up the white eye-socket a bit or my outline will end up being to intense/thick. Therefore I carefully repaint the eye-socket white and correct the black outline a bit.
  4. Next I painted black dots for the pupils with a less diluted paint (70-80% paint : 30-20% water).

Once the eyes were done I switched back to his skin and started with the shadows.

I applied the first shadow always moving the brush towards the deepest parts which will later receive the darkest color and using many layers always leaving a bit of the previous brush stroke untouched to build up the first shadow. Then I applied the second and third shadow also leaving a bit of the previous shadow untouched to build a transition towards the darkest shadow. Colors I used for the shadows:

  • Shadow I: GW Tallarn Flesh : GW Scorched Brown (6:1)
  • Shadow II: GW Tallarn Flesh : GW Scorched Brown (3:1)
  • Shadow III: GW Tallarn Flesh : GW Scorched Brown (1:1)

The last shadow color (Shadow IV) was used for the deepest recesses like his mouth and facial wrinkles.

  • Shadow IV: GW Scorched Brown

Then I started painting highlights. It’s pretty much the same as with shadows – moving the brush towards the highest parts which will receive most of the light, always leaving a bit of the previous highlight untouched to build a transition from the basecoat to my last highlight. The method presented here, in this Mad Hatter tutorial, is the one I usually use. Colors used for the highlights:

  • Highlight I: GW Tallarn Flesh : VMC Dark Flesh #019 (3:1)
  • Highlight II: GW Tallarn Flesh : VMC Dark Flesh #019 (1:1)
  • Highlight III: GW Tallarn Flesh : VMC Dark Flesh #019 : GW Skull White (1:1:2)

I used the last highlight (Highlight IV) only for a few bright-spots.

  • Highlight IV: GW Tallarn Flesh : VMC Dark Flesh #019 : GW Skull White (1:1:4)

Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (2)

2. Hair:

I basecoated his hair with the following mix:

  • Basecoat: GW Shadow Grey : VMC Black #169 (2:1)

Then highlighted it getting brighter towards the outside with the following colors:

  • Highlight I: GW Codex Grey (1:1 water)
  • Highlight II: GW Codex Grey : GW Skull White (2:1:3 water)

3. Coat, tuxedo and hat

I did some preshading and highlighting here that’s not something I usually do it sometimes just happens. 😉

Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (3)

After this was done I messed around with mix-ratios until I was satisfied with the colors and came out with the following mixes:

  • Highlight IV: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : GW Space Wolves Grey (2:1:9) + some GW Skull White
  • Highlight III: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : GW Space Wolves Grey (2:1:9)
  • Highlight II: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : GW Space Wolves Grey (2:1:6)
  • Highlight I: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : GW Space Wolves Grey (2:1:3)
  • Basecoat: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise (2:1)
  • Shadow I: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : VMC Black #169 (2:1:1)
  • Shadow II: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : VMC Black #169 (2:1:2)
  • Shadow III: GW Enchanted Blue : GW Hawk Turquoise : VMC Black #169 (2:1:3)

I painted highlights and shadows like described in the face part always moving the brush towards the deepest shadows and brightest highlights, using many thin layers and slowly building up the color.

The last highlight (Highlight IV) was only used on the upper parts as a last “popping” highlight like on the folds on his arm or his collar.

Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (4)

4. Belt-thing on his hat

  • Highlight III: GW Bestial Brown : GW Bleached Bone (2:3)
  • Highlight II: GW Bestial Brown : GW Bleached Bone (2:2)
  • Highlight I: GW Bestial Brown : GW Bleached Bone (2:1)
  • Basecoat: GW Bestial Brown
  • Shadow I: GW Bestial Brown : VMC Black #169 (3:1)
  • Shadow II: GW Bestial Brown : VMC Black #169 (3:2)

5. Pants

I paint every part as described above (first I apply the basecoat with 2-3 layers and then paint the shadows and highlights) so for the next few parts of my Mad Hatter tutorial I will only post the colors I used. 🙂

  • Highlight III: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth : VMC Yellow Ochre #121 (2:1:3)
  • Highlight II: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth : VMC Yellow Ochre #121 (2:1:2)
  • Highlight I: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth : VMC Yellow Ochre #121 (2:1:1)
  • Basecoat: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth (2:1)
  • Shadow I: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth : GW Scorched Brown (2:1:1)
  • Shadow II: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth : GW Scorched Brown (2:1:2)
  • Shadow III: GW Bestial Brown : GW Graveyard Earth : GW Scorched Brown (2:1:3)

6. Weapon – wood

  • Basecoat: GW Bestial Brown : VMC Dark Flesh (2:1)
  • Shadow I: GW Bestial Brown : VMC Dark Flesh : GW Scorched Brown (2:1:1)
  • Shadow II: GW Bestial Brown : VMC Dark Flesh : GW Scorched Brown (2:1:2)
  • Shadow III: GW Bestial Brown : VMC Dark Flesh : GW Scorched Brown (2:1:3)

Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (5)

7. NMM

Some of you may be checking this Mad Hatter tutorial in search for my NMM recipe. When I painted the NMM parts like his blade I tried to to push the highlights up to pure white and the shadows to a dark almost black tone. The colors I used for the silver NMM parts were:

Silver NMM

  • Highlight IV: GW Skull White (pure)
  • Highlight III: GW Codex Grey : GW Skull White (1:3)
  • Highlight II: GW Codex Grey : GW Skull White (1:2)
  • Highlight I: GW Codex Grey : GW Skull White (1:1)
  • Basecoat: GW Codex Grey
  • Shadow I: GW Codex Grey + VMC Black #169 (3:1)
  • Shadow II: GW Codex Grey + VMC Black #169 (2:1)
  • Shadow III: GW Codex Grey + VMC Black #169 (2:2)
  • Shadow IV: GW Codex Grey + VMC Black #169 (2:3)

To increase the last shadow a bit on the silver NMM parts I used some very diluted black (like a wash it was mostly “black water”) and carefully glazed this mix at the very end (bottom) of the last shadow.

Gold NMM

All Gold NMM parts were painted with the following colors:

  • Highlight III: GW Skull White (pure)
  • Highlight II: GW Snakebite Leather : GW Bubonic Brown : GW Skull White (1:1:3)
  • Highlight I: GW Snakebite Leather : GW Bubonic Brown : GW Skull White (1:1:1)
  • Basecoat: GW Snakebite Leather : GW Bubonic Brown (1:1)
  • Shadow I: GW Snakebite Leather : GW Bubonic Brown : GW Scorched Brown (1:1:1)
  • Shadow II: GW Snakebite Leather : GW Bubonic Brown : GW Scorched Brown (1:1:2)
  • Shadow III: GW Scorched Brown (pure)
  • Shadow IV: GW Scorched Brown : VMC Black #169 (2:1)

When painting small details like the gold NMM stuff on his bag or the belt buckle on his hat I usually don’t use the complete range of mixes. I basecoat the area as usual, use the first shadow/highlight but then I leave the second mix out and jump to the third shadow/highlight.

For large surfaces it’s the same procedure as with the other parts.

Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (6)

8. Bag & accessories

The NMM parts were painted with the colors described above in an earlier part of this Mad Hatter tutorial and for the bag I used the following mixes:

  • Glaze: VMC Yellow Ochre #121 (80% water) — only glazed over the highlights to get a bit of a yellow in there
  • Highlight III: GW Bestial Brown : GW Bleached Bone (2:3)
  • Highlight II: GW Bestial Brown : GW Bleached Bone (2:2)
  • Highlight I: GW Bestial Brown : GW Bleached Bone (2:1)
  • Basecoat: GW Bestial Brown
  • Shadow I: GW Bestial Brown : GW Scorched Brown (2:1)
  • Shadow II: GW Bestial Brown : GW Scorched Brown (2:2)
  • Shadow III: GW Bestial Brown : GW Scorched Brown (2:3)

Ok that’s pretty much it. I hope you enjoyed reading this little walkthrough and found something interesting.

Done!

And here are some final pictures of the miniature. If you recreated the steps presented in my Seamus the Mad Hatter tutorial, you should achieve similar results:

Malifaux: Seamus the Mad Hatter - tutorial (7)

— P1per

Warhammer 40.000 25th Anniversary Space Marine model – Review

Today Benathai paid me a visit and showed me one of the latest products from Games Workshop’s Citadel Finecast range: The 25th Anniversary Space Marine. Review of this model may be of interest to some of you, so I decided to share my impressions from unboxing this miniature.

Warhammer 40.000 25th Anniversary Space Marine model - review

25th Anniversary Space Marines Captain

So far it’s been the best Finecast model I’ve seen, and Benathai’s opinion is exactly the same.

The model was created to commemorate the 25th Anniversary of Warhammer 40.000, so the inspiration with nostalgic memories of the beginnings of this system is tangible. And that is great! I join the choir of sentimental voices from the miniature painting and gaming community, as the RPG-like character of scenarios from the first edition of Warhammer 40.000, also known as Rogue Trader, was a great approach to miniature wargaming and it emphasized the fluff of that universe. This is also reflected in artwork from that period, which put much emphasis on individual character of depicted personalities.

The company managed to hit a soft spot with this model and approach, and in my humble opinion this way they managed to reach the target group of not only gamers but also collectors and miniature painters, because the models – even if based on early Warhammer 40K artwork – stand up to current standards of the industry. And it must be said that the models faithfully represent the characters depicted. If you haven’t had a chance to compare them, here you go:

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There’s also another model based on an iconic artwork from the past – Games Day 2012 special miniature based on the cover of 2nd edition of Warhammer 40.000. (I hope to be able to get this one ^^ – leave some for me!)

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Warhammer 40.000 25th Anniversary Space Marine model - review (6)

Ok, let me return to describing what I expect to be another collection of air bubbles trapped in resin.

Close examination

In order to prepare our 25th Anniversary Space Marine review, we took the miniature under magnifying glass (ok, not quite, but two pairs of eyes scanned the miniature for flaws carefully in strong light). And here’s what surprised us:

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Warhammer 40.000 25th Anniversary Space Marine model - review (3)

A decent package – the box is one of those that protect the model inside, so no parts of the miniature were broken.

Quality of the box and print cannot be called anything but good. It opens like a book revealing photos depicting a painted version of the model.

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So the first impression was a very pleasantly surprise that the sprue isn’t deformed as much as I would have expected after my first experience with Finecast models. Was it a good omen?

Warhammer 40.000 25th Anniversary Space Marine model - review (1)

We spotted mould lines in a few places:

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Will you agree they don’t look all that bad? The one running along the banner is the worst of them, but fortunately it’s not a bad place and should be easy to fix. Mould lines on the marine were going in pretty acceptable places and fortunately all of them were shallow.

The only thing that I would like to mention as a negative surprise was the amount of flash, seen for example on the backpack.

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Warhammer 40.000 25th Anniversary Space Marine model - review (13)

Also the scenic base insert was slightly warped. Nothing that wouldn’t be easily fixed, but it should be mentioned nonetheless.

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Hunt for bubbles

It’s time to take a closer look to those infamous air bubbles:

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Did you see what we saw? Is it a kind of magic? Can Finecast models really look unlike foam?!

The few holes we found were completely compensated for with the quality of the sculpt. The surface is smooth. And have you paid attention to these shoulderpads and leg plates? Details are crisp, clean and sharp.

Benathai commened that “these are self-painting details” – and I think he’s quite right 😉 These are difficult times for professional painters, as with such models it suffices to learn to use washes for detailing and even inexperienced painters will achieve good results. 😛

Conclusion of our 25th Anniversary Space Marine review

How positively surprised we are with this model! Is this a sign of improvement of quality of Finecast models? I wish! Unfortunately I am afraid it may be too early to announce such positive changes, because we might be simply lucky with our miniature. Examples seen in the internet seem to confirm my doubts.

So far it’s been the best Finecast model I’ve seen, and Benathai’s opinion is exactly the same. Hasn’t it been for the photos of less fortunate castings we’ve seen in the internet, we would believe it’s a moment that Citadel Finecast models begin to live up to their name.

We’re going to have another example of this model soon, so I hope it won’t disappoint us and our expectations are not too high. Of course we will inform you about it.

Privateer Press plastic Warpwolf – Review

A while ago Privateer Press announced that they would introduce plastic figures into their miniature range to counter the ever-increasing price of metal. Nowadays Privateer Press has a nice selection of plastic figs and as one of those figs is the new Hordes plastic Warpwolf – review was in order.

Privateer Press Plastic Warpwolf Review (1)

This set contains enough components to build one of three warpwolves. The advised retail price is $34,99.

What’s in the box?

Upon opening the box I find all part of the warbeast sealed in a plastic, with the stat cards nicely tucked away in a small recess on the bottom of the box.

Privateer Press Plastic Warpwolf Review (2)

Our plastic Warpwolf review needs a detalied rundown of the contents of that little bag, which are:

  • 3 different heads, one for each class of warpwolf
  • 3 left arms and 3 right arms
  • 2 left hands and 2 right hands
  • Torso and pelvis area
  • A pair of legs
  • A tail
  • Round 50mm base
  • stat cards.

Privateer Press Plastic Warpwolf Review (3)

Upon first inspection the pieces look good. The quality of the cast is good. There is a nice amount of details and a bit of variation between the pieces. Every piece has a little peg to fit in a corresponding hole on the body. They fit with no gaps, but you can see where the parts come together, so I needs a bit of putty to make those areas nice and smooth.

Privateer Press Plastic Warpwolf Review (4)

Privateer Press Plastic Warpwolf Review (5)

Privateer Press Plastic Warpwolf Review (6)

Privateer Press Plastic Warpwolf Review (7)

When I look a bit closer to the individual pieces I can find no air bubbles, no heavy flash and little to no moldlines.

A big plus is that the moldlines are on easy to reach places and not crossing or obscuring small details. The heaviest moldline in my case was one crossing the torso and it was easily removed using a sharp knife.

Privateer Press Plastic Warpwolf Review (9)

A special note for gamers

There is a possibility to magnetize this kit, but it’s not as easy as on the plastic warjack kits. The pegs and holes have an odd shape and you might need to file down and cut a bit in order to get a magnet in. The best idea is probably to choose a set of arms which you like best and only magnetize the heads and hands. Keep in mind when magnetizing that the fit of each part is not completely seamless. You will be able to see where the different parts come together.

Conclusion of my plastic Warpwolf review

After the Khador warjack kit, this is only my second plastic kit from Privateer Press and I’m pleasantly surprised by the overall quality. It has definitely improved since the warjack kits and it shows that PP puts in some effort to create a good product.

I like the sculpt as well. It’s personal taste of course but compared to the old models I think the different models in this kit are quite an improvement.

Now that you have read my plastic Warpwolf review you must be wondering would I recommend this model? Yes, to both painters and gamers. It is a good-looking fig of good quality with a nice mix of details. It’s easy to assemble and doesn’t require much work in the way of cleaning.

Good job Privateer Press!