The GÅRDBÛK Shrine ruins

I just painted one of terrain pieces from The GÅRDBÛK Shrine: Wargames Winter Complete Terrain Sets Kickstarter from StudioLevel.
The terrain sets available there are already painted in winter theme, but you also have an opportunity to buy unpainted ones as well. This way you can paint them your way – just as I did.
The terrain sets are made of high density polyurethane. They are light but durable. They even have plastic plants attached! The unpainted ones are supplied already primed, so you can go in for painting straight away. Before painting I attached some static grass, as I wanted to paint the ruins rather in autumn scheme instead od winter one. After glueing I sprayed the grass with primer to further seal it. Here is how it looked in the beginning.

StudioLevel Terrain
StudioLevel Terrain

I think that nothing can beat airbrush in fast painting large surfaces, so I used it to paint the whole terrain piece. I used shades of brown and beige for the ground and ruins. I tried to use varius color mixes to make it look more interesting. I also sprayed grass and plastic plants with green paint.

StudioLevel Terrain
StudioLevel Terrain

That is the magic of using airbrush over dark primer – at this stage the terrain looks good without need to apply any wash that could make the whole scene too dark. I wanted it to look like on sunny, autumn day – as we have now in Poland 😉
The next stage was drybrushing everything with light beige color. I did not want to overdo it, so I tried to apply it gently.

StudioLevel Terrain
StudioLevel Terrain

The last stage was detailing the terrain piece – adding some shades, damp patches and of course fallen leaves (made of birch seeds).

StudioLevel Terrain
StudioLevel Terrain
StudioLevel Terrain
StudioLevel Terrain

Here is the photo on more gaming background including 30mm figures for scale.

StudioLevel Terrain

As you can see – the ruins are really big and can be decoration of any wargames table. They shoulf fit fantasy games, as well as S-F ones. There are many more terrain sets available from StudioLevel that are worth to have a look. I will paint some more in the following days.

Pimped up Detolf

After some break caused by moving to a new apartment I am back again 🙂 This time it is not a post about painted miniatures but about place to store them. For my new workshop I bought Ikea Detolf – quite common furniture in any miniature painter’s / collector’s room – probably because its affordable price. The standard cabinet has only 3 shelves with spaces between them about 400mm. I don’t plan to paint such huge monsters, so I decided to organize the space in more economical way.
I ordered 7 glass tiles in size of existing shelves (385mm x 292mm x 4mm). I also bought 6mm steel plain rods and cut them to the right length (316mm). I went to local workshop to have them welded to the original structure (I had to remove the paint from points where the new rods were to be attached). After that I painted the new rods with anti-corrosion grey paint, and then sprayed the whole metal elements with grey gloss paint to obtain uniformed color of new and old parts. Now I have 11 levels to put my miniatures – from 270mm at the bottom (for the bigger monsters or buildings) to about 130-150mm on the other levels. That should be enough for any 28-80mm scale miniatures I plan to paint in the future.

Display cabinet

Display cabinet

Display cabinet
Even large monsters from Mierce Miniatures fit well on 130mm shelves.

Display cabinet
Finaly I have place to display my 300mm x 300mm 3D Bases from Manorhouse Workshop.

I also bought some self-adhesive brush tape to make my cabinet dust-proof. I used 2 sizes of it – 4mm high for area of hinges and 8mm high for all the other areas around the door.

Display cabinet

All these alterations (glass tiles, steel rods, welding, paint and brush tape) costed me as much as the cabinet itself. Was it worth it? If you don’t have unlimited space in your miniatures warehouse and you want to organize the space in a wise way – I think it was worth it.